Imagined Spaces

I. Topic
• Big Idea: Imagination
• Key Concept: Shape and form can be used in art making to create three-dimensional imaginative objects.

II. Objectives / Expected Learner Outcomes

• Students will learn how the elements of shape and form are used in art to create imaginative objects.
• Students will understand that shape is two-dimensional and form is three-dimensional.
• Students will be able to construct three-dimensional objects based on their two-dimensional drawings.

III. Standards of Education
NA-VA.K-4.1 UNDERSTANDING AND APPLYING MEDIA, TECHNIQUES, AND PROCESSES
Achievement Standard:
    - Students know the differences between materials, techniques, and processes
    - Students describe how different materials, techniques, and processes cause different responses
    - Students use different media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories
    - Students use art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner

Related Virginia Visual Arts Standards of Learning
         5.3 The student will use the elements of art—line, shape, form, color, value, texture, and space—to express ideas, images, and emotions.

IV. Student Group Targeted
• Fourth - Fifth Grade

• Prerequisite skills/knowledge:
Basic drawings skills, how to cut out objects from paper and/or cardboard surfaces

V. Time Required
One session, 50 minutes

VI. Materials and Resources
Aluminum Foil
Cardboard
Colored Paper
Tissue Paper
Markers
Pencils
Scissors
Tape
Glue and glitter glue
Egg Cartons
Found objects (in the art room)
Crayola model magic

VII. Itinerary and Strategies
Key terms/vocabulary
Two-dimensional- having the two dimensions of length and width

Shape- a two-dimensional enclosed space

Characteristics of geometric shapes: they have clear defined edges, usually made with mathematical tools or formulas. Examples: circle, square, triangle

Characteristics of organic shapes: they have natural lines, patterns and designs. They are often seen in the natural world around us. Examples: clouds, leaves, rocks

Form- The shape and structure of a three-dimensional object. Examples: cube, cylinder, cone), as opposed to a shape, which is two-dimensional, or flat.

Three-dimensional- having the three dimensions of height, width, and depth

Introduction (10 minutes)

Good morning everyone, My name is Ms. Cook and I will be guiding you through your next lesson your imaginative mini-instillation projects.
Are you all excited to continue working on your projects today!?! (Great! Well, today we are going to create the objects that will go inside the spaces you drew out and began to decorate last class.)
Before we start on today’s lesson, Will someone explain to me what two lessons you all worked on last class with Ms. V and Ms. Lehr?
(Drew pictures of our imagined spaces and designed the backgrounds for our imagined spaces)

But before we start on today’s lesson, will somebody please explain the difference between what is real and what is imagined? (Things that are imagined are things that we create in our head/minds, you usually do not see them in person in the world around you, while real things are some thing you can see in object form in front of you/ or in real life.)

Motivation and Explaination Today we are going to be learning about how to make 3D objects from your 2D drawings.Will somebody please read the definition of 2D from the board?(Two-dimensional- having the two dimensions of length and width)

Checking for understanding:

Now that we know 2d means some thing with only length and height, look at the objects on the table in front of you. Find an object that has only two dimensions and hold it up in front of you (the drawing paper). Excellent.
Now that we all can see what 2d means, someone please read me the definition of shape off the board. (Shape- a two-dimensional enclosed space)Great.
Checking for understanding What are some of the shapes you see in this room? (the clock that is a circle, tables that are squares and rectangles, etc.) That’s right. Wow, you are all great observers!

There are two types of shapes, the ones you just pointed out in the room are called geometric shapes. Walk to board and read geometric definition. Geometric shapes have clear defined edges, usually made with mathematical tools or formulas, they are the types of shapes you study in your math classes.
Checking for understanding Will someone come to the board and draw an example of one of the geometric shapes we just talked about in the room. (circle, square, triangle, etc.) Good job.
Transition to organic shapes Are all shapes a square, a circle, a triangle or a rectangle? Walk over and show pictures of nature from the projector. These are examples of the second type of shapes. They are called organic shapes. Somebody read me the definition of organic shapes from the board. (organic shapes: they have natural lines, patterns and designs. They are often seen in the natural world around us. Examples: clouds, leaves, rocks.) Great.

Checking for understanding
What are some other examples of organic shapes you see in your natural surroundings? (trees, clouds, leaves, etc.) That’s Right!
Connection to lesson: Organic shapes can let you use your imagination to create any type of shape you want!
Transition to 3D

Someone read me definition of 3d and form. (Form- The shape and structure of a three-dimensional object. Examples: cube, cylinder, cone), as opposed to a shape, which is two-dimensional, or flat. (Three-dimensional- having the three dimensions of height, width, and depth) Can some point out or hold up an object with 3D form in the room? (pencil, markers, etc.) Show the box and paper example…when I hold these next to each other they appear to look the same, both having four sides- two long and two tall. But, when I turn this one (the box) we can see that it is made of much more that the paper. It has the dimension of depth- (run my hand along the side and center of the box). The box is not just shaped like a rectangle like the paper, it is a cube, which is a type of three-dimensional form. .

Does everyone understand difference between 2d shapes & 3d forms? (Yes, answer any questions if not)

Activity (30 total)
Today we are going to be creating 3d objects from your drawings with clay like material called model magic. Look at the various things you drew in your pictures last class and choose an object or figure from your drawings that you would like to mold today or you can create something new that you’d like to add to your imagined spaces. Everyone gather around for a demonstration of the materials!!!

Demonstration: (5 minutes)
Show how to roll the model magic to make lines that can be twisted to form other things. Mold a person. Show the examples from wed. of an alien, lollipop and the snail I made. Next, move onto show ho to use aluminum foil to crunch together and mold objects too.

Closure (5 minutes)
Give 5 minute warning. 5 minutes later…Before, we began clean up can I have everyone’s attention. Have the students all put down materials and return to the discussion table.

VIII. Evaluation Strategies (10 minutes)
Objective
Students will learn how the elements of shape and form are used in art to create imaginative objects.

Evaluation one
Through discussion at the end of class, students will share the objects they chose to put into their instillations and explain how they created and formed them to represent the shapes from their original sketches. They will also answer the question- what imaginative elements did you choose to add to your objects?

Objective two
Students will understand that shape is two-dimensional and form is three-dimensional.

Evaluation two
During this discussion I will ask the question, what makes their objects three-dimensional and their drawings two-dimensional? I will ask them what two objects (the paper and the box) at the beginning of class I used to show the difference between shape and form. What made the box three-dimensional?  If the shape of the paper is a rectangle what form is the box called? (it had depth, it is a cube)

Objective three
Students will be able to construct three-dimensional objects based on their two-dimensional drawings.

Evaluation three
I will ask the students: What part of your drawing did you choose to make a 3D object of? Why did they choose to include this in their imagined space? What materials did you use to construct your objects?


IX. Suggested Supplemental Activities
Take a field trip to a museum to view imaginative sculptures from a variety of artists.